Author Archives: Melissa Kean

Special Convocation, October 24, 1960

  Ike was here, right before the 1960 election. I know from correspondence in the Oveta Culp Hobby Papers that he was in Houston at her invitation and that she made the arrangements for him to speak at Rice. The … Continue reading

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1971

I’m taking a break from all the power plant drama today, just to catch my breath. What I have instead is this picture taken at Norman Hackerman’s inauguration in September, 1971. It just struck me as 1971 in a nutshell: … Continue reading

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Wherein Someone Else’s Notes Shed Light on the Power Plant

Remember a couple weeks ago I got my hands on documentation of the oil shipments to the power plant? There were other things in that batch of papers that turned out to be quite intriguing, most notably this innocuous seeming set … Continue reading

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Some Answers About the Railroad Spur

The William Ward Watkin negatives (with indices) that I discovered last week turn out to surpass even my wildest dreams. Here’s just the first example. Some of you will remember this striking photograph, which shows a rail car off to … Continue reading

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Friday Afternoon Follies: Cocktail Hour

“What Would Margaret Think??” You’ve got to squint a little to see it , but that’s the question up on the wall at this Brown College party, sometime during the 1986-87 school year: Judging from the only photo of Margaret … Continue reading

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Thank You, William Ward Watkin!

I had a very big day today. I’m working on a project about the earliest history of the campus, which means we’re back in the pictures that supervising architect William Ward Watkin took to document the construction of the first … Continue reading

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A.B.C.

That’s how Arthur Benjamin Cohn signed everything. I’ve mentioned him several times before, always in passing and always in connection with some odd thing that turned up in his papers, but he deserves more respectful treatment. As Rice’s first (and … Continue reading

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