Inside the Community House

I found the picture that I posted last Friday—a high-spirited lass and her boyfriend outside the Episcopal Community House—in a student scrapbook that I haven’t spent a lot of time with until now. I was also astonished to find this image, quite blurry but the only one I’ve ever seen taken inside the building:

Community House interior 1919

Not exactly luxurious, is it? If you look at this shot of the outside, I think the windows look like they line up right.

Community House

Almost miraculously, in the same scrapbook, carefully tucked in the back, was this little pamphlet that explains the purpose of the House and the activities and services it would sponsor. This is one of the most interesting things I’ve come across recently, a little bit of insight into daily student life out on the edge of the city. It’s kind of a mixed bag—I knew about the dances and I expected the religious activities, but I was a little surprised by the barbershop “for the beautification of the men students” and the Pressing Club.

Community House pamphlet Louise Moore

Community House pamphlet 1919

Community House pamphlet 3

Bonus:Back of old gym 2012

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8 Responses to Inside the Community House

  1. almadenmike says:

    The “high-spirited lass” in yesterday top photo appears to be in the center of today’s … seated, second from the front (and to our left of the hatless lady in the chair in the front) and wearing a different hat from the one she wore in yeasterday’s photo.

  2. Richard A. Schafer says:

    I assume the “Pressing Club” was some sort of laundry service?

  3. They consistently misspell Thomas Cranmer’s name as “Cramner”. Couldn’t find a printer who was Episcopalian, I guess.

    • the Rev. John Price says:

      The oldest chalice in the St Bede’s sacristy was given “By the Cramner Society.” Seriously. I used it this evening at the midweek Eucharist.

  4. Grungy says:

    The old pool?

  5. Pingback: Vacation Week 2017: “Will Do Tricks for Tips” | Rice History Corner

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