“By Order of the Sophomore Class,” 1916

I found this beauty in the ARA Historical Commission collection last summer and it’s been burning a hole in my pocket ever since. This is the earliest iteration of the slime rules yet discovered and it raises quite a few questions in my mind. What the heck are cushes? Corn cob pipes–seriously? What does vamping the ladies consist of?

I’m a big fan of the “Button, fish” command, though, and I think it’s all the more reason to bring back beanies. Maybe I’ll suggest that to next year’s O-week coordinators. Something like that might get me on board with the whole deal.

Bonus:

 

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8 Responses to “By Order of the Sophomore Class,” 1916

  1. Carolyn E. Mitchell says:

    Please identify the photo. Thank you!

    Carolyn E. Mitchell

    Sent from my iPhone

    >

  2. Melissa Kean says:

    Sorry! It’s the Bioscience Research Collaborative building. It’s where the Grad House (formerly the Tidelands Motel) used to be. It’s big and shiny, although it has a lot of empty space inside.

  3. Owlcop says:

    Cush may refer to a cornbread hash or cake that became popular in the south following the Civil War. Today Cush (or Kush) is a name for synthetic marijuana.

  4. Galloway Hudson '60 says:

    40 years later, in 1956, the sophs were still mistreating the freshpersons, but that was the final year of “Freshman Guidance”, for several reasons, not least the fact that two sophs died while trying to take a captured used tire to the top of the Campanile. Also, the college system began in the spring of 1957, new dorm rooms and all. The net result is that, as sophs, we did not get to inflict the same pain we endured on the Class of 1961, although we did have a slime parade which, as I recall, proceeded to the Shamrock Hotel. I don’t think we had those ten commandments in 1956, but the effect was pretty much the same.

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