“Swinging Their Fists Manfully”: The Rice Band Saves the Day, 1935

I found this article about the Rice band getting into a fistfight in a scrapbook from the late 1930s. It looks like 1935, a good season under Coach Jimmy Kitts even though we lost this particular game. I love it but I don’t really know anything else about it and have never had enough time to spend digging for more.  Still, it’s a great story and this is a good chance to share it.

Band fights for Sammy late 1930s

Bonus: Yesterday’s comments on the 1980s baseball players brought the mustache lovers out of the woodwork. A regular reader writes: Why do you find the mustaches unsettling?? I think they’re majestic! There’s nothing more reassuring in a crisis than a man with a mustache taking charge. Ask anyone.

She might be kidding.

Extra Bonus:_MG_7568

Thanks: Thanks to all the commenters who helped identify the players in that photo and especially to Alan Shelby who made sure the right people saw it.

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11 Responses to “Swinging Their Fists Manfully”: The Rice Band Saves the Day, 1935

  1. Francis Eugene "Gene" PRATT, Institute Class of '56 says:

    Don’t I get a pat on the head, or a girl scout cookie, or anything?
    😦

  2. rick sheridan says:

    Melissa, Do you know who the shirtless guy is in 2/22/13 post and if so could you tell me?  And yes I am looking for the answer to Alan Shelby’s trivia question.  As far as I know we can use any means possible other than hacking into his computer, if that helps!lol   Rick Sheridan Wiess ’86

    From: Rice History Corner To: rickdaingerfield@yahoo.com Sent: Wednesday, February 27, 2013 3:55 PM Subject: [New post] “Swinging Their Fists Manfully”: The Rice Band Saves the Day, 1935

    Melissa Kean posted: “I found this article about the Rice band getting into a fistfight in a scrapbook from the late 1930s. It looks like 1935, a good season under Coach Jimmy Kitts even though we lost this particular game. I love it but I don’t really know anything else about” Respond to this post by replying above this line New post on Rice History Corner “Swinging Their Fists Manfully”: The Rice Band Saves the Day, 1935by Melissa Kean I found this article about the Rice band getting into a fistfight in a scrapbook from the late 1930s. It looks like 1935, a good season under Coach Jimmy Kitts even though we lost this particular game. I love it but I don’t really know anything else about it and have never had enough time to spend digging for more.  Still, it’s a great story and this is a good chance to share it. Bonus: Yesterday’s comments

  3. Deborah Gronke Bennett (BSEE Hanszen '82) says:

    BTW, Melissa, I envy that you are on vacation. I am near Houston right now (in Friendswood) and the weather is cold and blustery. (Fits our mood, I’m here for a funeral). I hope your week was warm and sunny.

    • Francis Eugene "Gene" PRATT, Institute Class of '56 says:

      Deborah,
      You call this cold?
      Why, when I came to Rice back in ’52, it was REALLY COLD.

      Of course, that was before all this newfangled “global warming” stuff started.

    • Melissa Kean says:

      Deborah, I’m so sorry for your loss.

      It was a wonderful few days away in a beautiful place. We spent yesterday traveling home and I’ll be back at work today. Please do let me know if you’ll make it to campus–I’d love to meet you.

  4. Apropos of all this talk about band and fistfights and baseball and the Southwest Conference: I’ve seen this story repeated several times and even mentioned by respected baseball historian Bill James, but I’ve also heard that the original source may have been Ted Lyons himself, who occasionally made up tall tales.

    Pitcher Ted Lyons, who had a 20-year career with the Chicago White Sox before WWII and is in the Baseball Hall of Fame, apparently went to Baylor on a trombone scholarship. A fistfight broke out during a game (with A&M, I think.) and his trombone got stepped on. In order to keep his scholarship, Lyons tried out for the Baylor baseball team and did so well that he got signed by the White Sox organization. I can think of several problems with this story, not least is that you wouldn’t think that a scholarship musician couldn’t get his horn repaired or get a different one without too much trouble. This was, after all, before the Depression. Still, it’s a cute story and seems to fit in with what we’ve been talking about lately.

  5. Grungy says:

    The creator of the Existential Cheer (Andy Kopra) switched to leading cheers from within The MOB after his clarinet was stolen. Don’t know why he didn’t try to replace it (either), but grateful that he found a way to channel his creative energy.

    • Deborah Gronke Bennett (BSEE Hanszen '82) says:

      Is this the Existential Cheer?

      We’re from Rice.
      Ain’t that nice.
      Who are you?
      Do you know?

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