The Mount Rushmore of Dentistry

A few weeks ago we had a researcher who was using the papers of Rice English Professor George Williams, ’23. While he kindly pointed me to some surprising materials in the second box (for which I’m most grateful), when I looked at Williams’s personal correspondence in Box 1 I was stopped cold.

Williams had left a note in each folder describing the person who wrote the letters and his perspective on their relationship. It was hair raising. He was talking to me. Really, it felt like I was being addressed personally from beyond. This might sound like fun but when you think about it it’s not an unmixed blessing.

Often Williams was telling me new things about people I already knew but sometimes he introduced me to Rice graduates I’d never heard of before. One of these remarkable people is a fellow named Sumter Arnim, ’26. The interesting thing about his senior picture in the Campanile is that there are no extracurricular activities listed, something that wasn’t unheard of but also wasn’t common during these times. After further investigation I’d guess that it was because he was studying.

Sumter Arnim 1926 campanile 047

 

Here’s Williams’s note:

Sumter Arnim note 1 George Williams Papers 4 34 045

Sumter Arnim note 2 George Williams Papers 4 34 046

Sure enough, when I started looking the very first thing I found was an article explaining why Arnim’s face belonged on the Dental Mount Rushmore. It’s rather mind boggling, somewhat like reading about the invention of the forward pass in football. Take a look–it’s well worth it.

Expect more of these notes as I slowly digest all the new information.

Bonus:

IMG_2912

Extra Bonus: Go here for gorgeous pictures of Rice from Campus Photographers Tommy Lavergne and Jeff Fitlow.

Really.

Go.

 

 

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8 Responses to The Mount Rushmore of Dentistry

  1. Nick Papas says:

    So amazing, fascinating AND wonderful!

    On Thu, Mar 31, 2016 at 6:09 PM, Rice History Corner wrote:

    > Melissa Kean posted: “A few weeks ago we had a researcher who was using > the papers of Rice English Professor George Williams, ’23. While he kindly > pointed me to some surprising materials in the second box (for which I’m > most grateful), when I looked at Williams’s personal corr” >

  2. Bill Peebles, Hanszen '70 says:

    If I had all the money I’ve spent on my teeth I could buy a nice car. But then, I suppose I’d rather be able to chew.

  3. Wow. His Ph. D was in medical pathology, but he got the research Ph. D, not the clinical M.D. The Mount Rushmore article incorrectly gives him an M.D., also.

  4. I’m pleased you found my blog about Dr. Arnim’s face on the Dental Mount Rushmore. His writings and those of Dr. C.C. Bass, should be required ready for all dental students. Their ground-breaking research and application to control of Man’s most common disease (dental disease) seems to be Nobel Prize material. William T. Brown, D.D.S.

  5. Buddy Chuoke '75 says:

    As a student at the University of Texas Dental Branch from 1976 to 1980, I heard the name of Dr. Arnim mentioned reverently in word and print by older faculty members. His recruit, Dr. Levy, was still walking the halls while I was in attendance and was a very kind to everyone, even the newbie freshmen dental students.Thanks for the reminder of a fellow Rice grad who made his mark in my chosen profession

  6. Celeste Arnim Matthews says:

    It was very interesting for me to read this article – Dr. Arnim was my great-great uncle, and this picture is almost a spitting image of my father! Thanks for posting!

  7. Pingback: “Dear George,” 1967 | Rice History Corner

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